DEVOTIONAL

PAUSE FOR A DRINK

Our Soul’s Desire

“Yes, in the way of your judgments, O Lord, we have waited for you; the desire of our souls is for your name and for the remembrance of you.”
– Isaiah 26:8

There is much that can be said about Isaiah 26 and the context in which it was written but I want to briefly draw attention to verse 8.An important insight from this verse is that there is an important relationship between our soul’s desire and our walk i.e. our lives. The way in which I walk speaks of the things that my soul longs after and the desire of my soul leads me in how I walk. In other words, the verse declares “Lord, while we have been waiting expectantly for your deliverance, we have walked in your ways. Why? Because, passion of our souls, our earnest and fervent desire is that you will be glorified and that your name will be renowned among all.” When someone is truly passionate about something, it consumes them to such an extent that, without saying anything about this passion, an outside observer can see the longings of the person’s heart by simply watching their action. For some, the desire and passion for bringing glory to God may not be present because, in their minds, God lives for them rather than they living for God! For others, the desire is there but it’s down at the bottom of the list among many other desires, and, therefore not the primary driving force in their lives.

This week, let’s do some honest self-examination. Ask yourself, what’s the chief desire of my soul? What drives me? What motivates me? When I’m pursuing a new ambition or goal, what do I hope will come out of it? Is it for success such that people will celebrate and give mecredit or is that through it everyone will see the God whom I serve? As believers, you and I, have to reach a place where our lives and lips are aligned in glorifying God. In other words, we need to be at a place where we not only speak of His glory, but we also reflect His glory by our lives so that others will encounter Him as they interact with us.

Prayer: O God, teach me your ways so that I may walk with you. The desire of my soul is to love you and live to glorify you! I no longer want to glorify you just with my lips but I want to exalt you with my life. So, help me Holy Spirit, stir up in my soul a desire foryou until it becomes an all-consuming fire and a burning passion in my life. Amen.

To Whom, Have I Come?

“Yet I say to you that in this place there is One greater than the temple”
– Matthew 12:6

Is it possible for a palace to be greater than a king? Of course not, without the king a palace is just a mansion. It is the fact that the king dwells in it that makes that mansion a palace. In the same way, the temple is great only because God dwells there. And the One who dwells in the temple shall always be greater than the temple. So, Jesus is greater than the temple. When we accepted Him as our personal savior we came to Him, not to the temple. When we come to worship in a church, we come to a Person, not to a place. Our conversion is about a relationship, This is what the Apostle Paul spoke of in Romans 8:15, when he wrote that we have received the Spirit of adoption by whom we cry out “Abba, Father.”

Unfortunately, we live in a society where sometimes it seems like the edifices that people have erected to God have become greater than God, Himself. In other words, people are just in a relationship with the church, and not with God. Sometimes even as Christians, our loyalty to the church can become greater than our passion for God and His glory! Some have become like the Pharisees who knew every rule in the book and followed temple practices in every detail, but when the very King of the temple stood before them, they could not recognize Him. They made the temple greater than the King. As we go to worship this week, let’s be reminded that we have come to God, not to a place. And, as we are reminded of this, may we ask ourselves, “Who is this God that we have come to?”

May we pursue and seek to know Him with all our hearts and minds. Amen

Written by Dr. Martha Amoako